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Nerdy.Gamer.Chick

archiemcphee:

We love Tsuneaki Hiramatsu’s awesome photos of fireflies and their dreamy light trails!

The photos, taken in various places around Maniwa and Okayama Prefecture in Japan, are a series of slow shutter and multi-exposure composites that show fireflies as they mate after thunderstorms during the June to July rainy season. Light painting in photography is nothing new, but the fact that these “light paintings” are all natural make them all the more beautiful. Neither the lights nor the strokes are man-made, rather, both are a part of nature and Hiramatsu was only there to capture these magnificent scenes.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of these magical photos!



astronomican:

Sisters of Battle. 

inquisitorpsyduck:

skywalllker:

WARHAMMER: Sisters of battle

Love that first one.  Need a copy to hang somewhere.


archiemcphee:

This massive piece of art that appears to be a simple line drawing of a sheet of paper is an awesome optical illusion created by sculptor Neil Dawson. It’s located in New Zealand on ”The Farm”, a large private art park owned by Alan Gibbs.

[via Sweet Station]


archiemcphee:

Some people turn eggshells into exquisite works of art, but did you know that eggshells were once at the heart of a superstition concerning witchcraft?

“It was once held as superstition that if you did not crush the ends of an egg after eating it, a witch would gather the shells and use them to craft a boat that she could use to sail out to sea to raise storms. This is a very ancient superstition which seems to originate in the 1580s. If you shattered the end of the shell, it would create enough holes to make it useless as a boat. We won’t even go into the logic of how a full-sized human might be able to stand in an egg shell – that was obviously not on the minds of our superstitious forebears.”

[Photos via Toxel.com and info via Listverse]


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persephonemag:

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bedbugsbiting:

findingsherlock:

poboh:

The Irritating Gentleman, Berthold Woltze. Germany (1829 – 1896)

FS says: I love this because it speaks very much to the sociological effect of modernity. Suddenly people were trapped in carriages with other people more and more often, and middle class women were suddenly traveling alone far more often than ever before. This meant that there was a huge need for cultural rules to come into play, rules we see and use to this day. Imagine you are in a bus, do you look at people around you? In the eyes? Do you speak with people you sit next to? How about in elevators? Probably not. This is the social conditioning of urbane modernity. And it started when people were thrown more and more together for longer periods. 
Basically its this guy’s fault that you feel so alone in a crowd. 

I find it utterly fascinating that “irritating gentlemen” have been a problem on public transportation for so long. The weary look on this woman’s face says it all. I have worn that look many times.

bedbugsbiting:

findingsherlock:

poboh:

The Irritating Gentleman, Berthold Woltze. Germany (1829 – 1896)

FS says: I love this because it speaks very much to the sociological effect of modernity. Suddenly people were trapped in carriages with other people more and more often, and middle class women were suddenly traveling alone far more often than ever before. This meant that there was a huge need for cultural rules to come into play, rules we see and use to this day. Imagine you are in a bus, do you look at people around you? In the eyes? Do you speak with people you sit next to? How about in elevators? Probably not. This is the social conditioning of urbane modernity. And it started when people were thrown more and more together for longer periods. 

Basically its this guy’s fault that you feel so alone in a crowd. 

I find it utterly fascinating that “irritating gentlemen” have been a problem on public transportation for so long. The weary look on this woman’s face says it all. I have worn that look many times.



misstuesday:

pulmonaire:

Augusto Esquivel is well-known for making three-dimensional sculptures from sewing buttons.

This is incredible!